Tarots of the Day Friday

The World: Completion. Perfection. Recognition. Honors. Ultimate change. The end result of all efforts. Success. Assurance. Synthesis. Fulfillment. Triumph in undertakings. The rewards that come from hard work. The path of liberation. Eternal life. Admiration of others. Inheritance. This is a very favorable card, especially if surrounded by other favorable cards.

The Devil: Being seduced by the material world and physical pleasures. Lust for and obsession with money and power. Living in fear, domination and bondage. Being caged by an overabundance of luxury. Discretion should be used in personal and business matters.

mythology

detritus

opinion

Bad Santa indeed

Aaarrggh!!! I’d written a post and tried to post a link to a website that counted down the days until Christmas and was gunned down by a flash animation and loud musical rendition of electronic Jingle Bells. Ovewhelmed my browser. Won’t share the link as I have no desire to share the agony…

Wanted to mention that it’s International Buy Nothing Day and to add the caveat that local businesses and jewelry sellers in the mall, for example don’t count as evil corporate entities, so by all means, buy from such merchants as they:)

And learned there’s a textbook on blogging. WTF? How self indulgent is that? But I wouldn’t mind it for Christmas. Or else this.

Other then that, all you’ve missed was a pastry recipe and tales of maternal guilt, which I shall expound on at a later date.

Peace out. Or whatever. Hope you had a happy holiday.

Corbid

Words I didn’t know, Part II

Exigent

(adjective)

[EK�sah�jahnt]

1. requiring immediate aid or action; urgent; pressing: “I understand that you’ve driven with faulty brakes for several weeks now without incident, but you don’t want to wait for the problem to become any more exigent.”

2. requiring significant effort or expense; demanding

adverb form: exigently

Origin:

Approximately 1670; a back formation of English, ‘exigency’; from Middle English, ‘exigence’; borrowed from Middle French, ‘exigence’; from Late Latin, ‘exigentia’; from Latin, ‘exigentem’ (nominative ‘exigens’), from ‘exigere’: to demand.

Tarot Card of the Day

Angel of Music: “Like as an angel glitt’ring in the sky, / In times of innocence and holy joy: / The joyful shepherd stops his grateful song. / To hear the music of an angel’s tongue”. A surge of passionate emotion. A call for compassion in the situation. A need to rise above a mundane or materialistic milieu. Possibility of being granted a favor or indulgence. An unexpected emotional influence. Emerging impulse to personal transformation. Development of appropriate aesthetic sensibility. Intuitive awareness of public needs or the mass media. In the creative process: An inrush of excitement or appearance of a new factor offers alternative possibilities for your work.

Thetis, Mother of Achilles

Thetis

by James Hunter

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Thetis was one of the Nereids. Zeus desired her, but she rejected his advances. The goddess Themis then revealed that Thetis was fated to bear a son who was mightier than his father; fearing for his dominion, Zeus gave Thetis as bride to a mortal, Peleus, and all the gods attended the wedding.

Thetis bore one son, Achilles, whom she tried unsuccessfully to make immortal. In one version of the story, she anointed the infant’s body with ambrosia and then placed it upon a fire in order to burn away the mortal parts; when she was interrupted by the child’s horrified father, she deserted their household in a rage. In a later version, she dipped the child in the river Styx holding him by the heel; all the parts that the river touched became invulnerable, but the heel remained dry. Achilles was later killed in the Trojan war.

Related information

Pronunciation

{thee’-tis}

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Thetis, Mother of Achilles

Thetis

by James Hunter

——————————————————————————–

Thetis was one of the Nereids. Zeus desired her, but she rejected his advances. The goddess Themis then revealed that Thetis was fated to bear a son who was mightier than his father; fearing for his dominion, Zeus gave Thetis as bride to a mortal, Peleus, and all the gods attended the wedding.

Thetis bore one son, Achilles, whom she tried unsuccessfully to make immortal. In one version of the story, she anointed the infant’s body with ambrosia and then placed it upon a fire in order to burn away the mortal parts; when she was interrupted by the child’s horrified father, she deserted their household in a rage. In a later version, she dipped the child in the river Styx holding him by the heel; all the parts that the river touched became invulnerable, but the heel remained dry. Achilles was later killed in the Trojan war.

Related information

Pronunciation

{thee’-tis}

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Celtic Tree Cards of the day…

The Past:

Hawthorn

Patience required

The situation has been frustrating, and you may have reacted somewhat hastily. Examine the past and see if you rushed matters, or too-quickly chose between undesirable alternatives. Time has changed things, and perhaps opened up new options which could benefit you.

Hawthorn is the Ogham’s sixth tree, and the first of the second division. Its sharp thorns and beautiful flowers and leaves illustrate its symbolism- duality and potential danger therein. While it is often easy to see extremes, wisdom usually lies in a balance between them.

The Present:

Hazel

Wisdom

Gather information about the situation as the salmon gathers hazelnuts. Wisdom will come from learning as much as you can, and using intuition and logic to understand this knowledge. This insight will lead you to a creative and wise solution.

Many Celtic legends involve the hazel tree, and hazelnuts which give wisdom- especially to the salmon that live in the pool under the tree and eat the nuts. Hazel symbolizes deep wisdom and insight, used to inspire creativity and resolve conflict. The hazel is the ninth tree of the Ogham.

The Future:

Fir

Objectivity

You will be in a good position to view the situation with some objectivity, and to gain some knowledge that will help to resolve it. Take advantage of this opportunity, remembering that some distance can help you for a time, but is most useful when blended with your personal knowledge and involvement.

The fir is the sixteenth Ogham tree and the first of the fourth grouping, ususally considered to be the vowels. (Some scholars consider this tree to be the elm.) The fir is the tallest native tree, and it grows on hills and mountains, which add to its height. This is why the fir symbolizes objectivity and perspective, a distance that aids one in seeing clearly.

detritus

Celtic Tree Cards of the day…

The Past:

Hawthorn

Patience required

The situation has been frustrating, and you may have reacted somewhat hastily. Examine the past and see if you rushed matters, or too-quickly chose between undesirable alternatives. Time has changed things, and perhaps opened up new options which could benefit you.

Hawthorn is the Ogham’s sixth tree, and the first of the second division. Its sharp thorns and beautiful flowers and leaves illustrate its symbolism- duality and potential danger therein. While it is often easy to see extremes, wisdom usually lies in a balance between them.

The Present:

Hazel

Wisdom

Gather information about the situation as the salmon gathers hazelnuts. Wisdom will come from learning as much as you can, and using intuition and logic to understand this knowledge. This insight will lead you to a creative and wise solution.

Many Celtic legends involve the hazel tree, and hazelnuts which give wisdom- especially to the salmon that live in the pool under the tree and eat the nuts. Hazel symbolizes deep wisdom and insight, used to inspire creativity and resolve conflict. The hazel is the ninth tree of the Ogham.

The Future:

Fir

Objectivity

You will be in a good position to view the situation with some objectivity, and to gain some knowledge that will help to resolve it. Take advantage of this opportunity, remembering that some distance can help you for a time, but is most useful when blended with your personal knowledge and involvement.

The fir is the sixteenth Ogham tree and the first of the fourth grouping, ususally considered to be the vowels. (Some scholars consider this tree to be the elm.) The fir is the tallest native tree, and it grows on hills and mountains, which add to its height. This is why the fir symbolizes objectivity and perspective, a distance that aids one in seeing clearly.

detritus